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Murder of Father James Coyle

Father Coyle was shot in the head on the porch of St. Paul's Rectory on August 11, 1921 by Methodist minister and Klansman E. R. Stephenson. The murder occurred only hours after Coyle officiated at a secret wedding between Stephenson's daughter, Ruth, and Pedro Gussman, a Puerto Rican who had met Ruth by doing work for Stephenson at his house and had been a customer of Stephenson's barber shop. Before the wedding, Ruth converted to Catholicism.

Father Coyle was the Knights of Columbus chaplain of Birmingham, Alabama Council 666.

2119 3rd Ave North, Birmingham, AL

Sources

Davies, Sharon (March 2010). "Tragedy in Birmingham". Columbia Magazine.

McGough, Helen (1 August 1941). "Things I Remember about Father Coyle, His Death, Twenty Years Afterwards". Catholic Weekly.

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Murder of Father James Coyle

Reverend Edwin Roscoe Stephenson (March 8, 1870 – August 4, 1956) was a minister of the now defunct Methodist Episcopal Church, South and a member of the Ku Klux Klan. He shot and killed Catholic priest James Coyle August 11, 1921, in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, but was acquitted of the murder. His main lawyer was future U.S. Supreme Court Justice and future U.S. Senator, Hugo Black.

This location is the site of the Stevenson home when the 1921 murder of Fr. Coyle occurred.

2212 3rd Ave N, Birmingham, AL

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Jefferson County Courthouse (#3 and #4)

716 Richard Arrington Jr Blvd N #251, Birmingham, AL 35203

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Ghost of Jane Schumer and Others

2201 3rd Ave N

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Pedro Gusmann

Intersection of 3rd Ave North and 21st Street North

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Jefferson County Jail

(1871? – 1936)

2201 4th Ave N

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Richard Hawes

Jefferson County Jail – 1888

2201 4th Ave N

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Hawes Riot

As the news spread through the city on December 8, a mob of 1,000 to 3,000 people, many of whom had been spending their off day in Birmingham's taverns, headed toward the Jefferson County Jail. Sheriff Joseph S. Smith issued shotguns and rifles to his Deputies and placed them in positions where they could protect the jail. He told them to fire into the mob if they came across the alley towards the jail door.

When the huge mob appeared near the alley, Sheriff Smith ordered them to stop, and counted to five. The mob ignored the warnings and continued across the alley. Smith then gave the order to fire. Ten died in the violence, including postmaster Maurice Throckmorton, a deputy U. S. Marshal, a civil engineer and a painter.

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YMCA

2201 4th Ave N

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First Presbyterian Church

2100 4th Ave N, Birmingham, AL 35203

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Tutweiler Hotel

2021 Park Pl, Birmingham, AL 35203

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Viva Health Building

Site of Original Tutweiler Hotel

417 20th St N, Birmingham, AL 35203

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Terminal Station

The Birmingham Terminal Station (or simply Birmingham Terminal), completed in 1909, was the principal railway station for Birmingham, Alabama (United States) until the 1950s. It was demolished in 1969 and its loss still serves as a rallying image for local preservationists.

501 Carraway Blvd, Birmingham, AL 35203

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Lou Wooster’s

1917 4th Ave N

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